How do Leaders earn respect ?


First of all we have to understand the meaning of Respect. What is Respect? Respect Means A feeling of deep admiration for someone or something elicited by their abilities, qualities, or achievements.
Why do we need respect ? Because respect gives you a self-confidence.
Why do Leaders need Respect ? If your greatest goal is to please people, become an entertainer; if you want to be a great leader, expect to have those who oppose you.
Strong leaders are driven by the vision, not by the daily conversations and affirmation of their staff, team, and those around them.Those driven by a need for love rather than respect usually have emotional highs and they are always either very happy or very depressed.

I have asked a question about this on Linkedin-
How do leaders earn respect ? And how can they gain respect? (Originally asked by Dan in his blog)
Here are some responses–
On 08/02/11 5:26 PM, Frank Feather wrote:
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Respect is a two-way street. You gain/earn respect by first giving it.
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On 08/02/11 1:06 PM, Mark Harbeke wrote:
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Stan Slap spoke last month at a conference our organization co-hosted with Inc. Magazine, and he had some great advice on this. One of my takeaways hearing him was that leadership is about providing a lifeline of certainty in a sea of uncertainty – those that excel at this become “chief” of the culture, and it orbits him or her. When this happens – and it takes a long time, a diligent focus and of course open and honest communication – it becomes extremely useful for the CEO because he or she will hear some of the chatter that he/she would not have been privy to if his/her employees were not “orbiting” him/her. He also said that leadership is about living better, while management is about merely working harder.

Links:

http://www.winningworkplaces.org/library/success/hitachi_cs/WW_Questions-2.pdf

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On 08/02/11 1:32 AM, Ricardo Andorinho wrote:
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Hi,

your question drives me to the best (im my opinion of course) definition of leadership coined by Mark Herbert: “Leadership is a moral contract between those who wish to lead
and those who consent to be led.”

You can read this great article by Mark.

http://newparadigmsllc.com/wordpress/2011/07/defining-leadership.html

best regards,
ricardo
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On 08/02/11 9:01 AM, Kenneth Larson wrote:
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1. Knowing how much leadership to offer and how much to let the individuals grow on their own.

2. Striking the right balance between specific and generic guidance so the unique individual traits of the workers come through in the business model and solutions to problems, system design and success of the firm are derived from the people running the enterprise and not from the leader.

3. Managing constructively by fostering an environment respectful of all points of view but driving to fulfilling progressive objectives as a first priority and blend differences of opinion decisively
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On 08/02/11 7:33 AM, Steve DiMichele wrote:
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Respect is earned through a culmination of actions between the leader and his/her subordinates. It is gained through a collaborative effort in the workplace where there is an open door policy to discuss ideas, support ideas and implement them. Further the leader should be representative of each of his/her subordinates through their own actions since company culture is set by its leaders and flows throughout the company.
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On 08/02/11 7:24 AM, Josh Schonhaut wrote:
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Leading by example. Giving respect and earning it rather than simply commanding it. Being reliable and patient. Not being afraid to make the tough decisions.
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On 08/02/11 6:59 AM, Jerry Linnins wrote:
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Leaders lead. That is what people look to them to do. You are not your organization’s “friend” or buddy, you are not one of the people, you are not the class clown. You are the Leader! As such, you should be trustworthy, know the business, collaborative, decisive, and a continuous learner.

Sometimes, respect IS demanded. We think that because we have a title, a position, some “leverage” we can use OVER others, they HAVE to respect us. IMHO, that is a false assumption. When I was in the Coast Guard we used to “test” our leaders by asking ourselves, if the ship was sinking, would we follow them into the lifeboat or want them in our lifeboat? Are they a leader in FACT or because they happen to be the organization’s senior agent at the moment?
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On 08/02/11 6:12 AM, Peter Urey wrote:
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They recognise the fears in others that are holding them back and help others to perform beyond their current limitations.

Links:

http://www.thefearlesspartnership.com

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On 08/02/11 5:32 AM, Juan Carlos Cuervo, MSc, LEED Green Associate, PMP wrote:
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Leaders gain respect by following a conduct code based on fairness, consistency, mutual respect, confidence, and approachability.
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On 08/01/11 7:59 PM, Praveen Kumar Kambhampati wrote:
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Leaders earn respect by living in practice what the followers think should be and have constraints in doing it themselves. Leaders earn respect by driving the team to success and giving them the credit for their achievement which the team members know individually that it was not possible without the leader.
Leaders earn respect by their ability to envision, convince and take ownership of the consequences of certain decisions. Ownership of risk and uncertainty is the key in leadership role. Who owns and stands firm gets respect for his struggle to straighten up things, no matter whether he succeeds.
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On 08/01/11 6:35 PM, Bruce Eberhardt wrote:
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respect is earned by leading by example, by being out front, by not asking your people to do that which you yourself won’t do, by giving credit even when its not deserved, by taking the blame even when its not deserved, by knowing exactly what you are doing and believing strongly in it, and by demanding even more from yourself than from anyone else
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On 08/01/11 6:21 PM, Don Koehler wrote:
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I believe earning respect is very easy to define and gain but extremely hard to reacquire when you lose it. Respect comes down to walking your talk. I have worked for people who I did not like but I respected them because they “walked the talk.” The “talk” involves the setting of a vision and defining expectations. The “walk” is staying true to what you set and treating people the same … no favorites and no changing the rules for a few.

If you fail to “walk the talk” you will lose respect and have a tremendously hard time getting it back.

Given that most people don’t leave a company they quit because of their supervisor. It is amazing to me that most companies don’t hire for leadership skills but for “tech” skills.
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On 08/01/11 6:12 PM, Jacques Chartrain wrote:
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Honesty, integrity and demonstrating the values they want others to follow.
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On 08/01/11 6:03 PM, Sid Savara wrote:
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I find the key is willing to make tough decisions confidently and in plain language explain the decision to their followers – persuading them that the decision is correct.

Ultimately, that’s what leadership comes down to: having followers who are willing to listen to your decisions, because they trust your reasoning and judgment.
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On 08/03/11 5:33 PM, Cristina Falcão wrote:
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I think there are a few basic rules a leader needs to have to set an example that employees can look upon, respect, and follow.
However powerful you might feel, in your top position as the leader, you will only be looked as such, respected and not questioned, if you have the “moral” right to speak your mind.
For instance, get to work before everyone and have the “moral” right to tell an employee that he/she is late.
Never use the company’s materials, resources, whatever for own personal needs, like using the phone to make private calls, taking a pen or a paper home, etc.
The person’s integrity must be obvious, unquestionable, and consistent. That also includes taking ethical decisions against his/her best interests.
Lead by example and inspire.

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On 08/03/11 1:28 PM, Cliff Lewis wrote:
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Leaders earn respect by respecting those whom they lead. They have a passion for what they do and they inspire others with that passion. They recognize the strengths of others, value their abilities and what they bring to an organization, and help them improve their skills. They give credit for work well done, and they are willing to take responsibility when things go wrong. Nothing destroys a leader’s credibility faster than blaming “a few bad apples in the organization” when a problem arises.
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On 08/04/11 1:42 PM, Alex Grechanowski wrote:
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Lalit,

I remember Scott Berkun answered this question in his book Making Things Happen (formerly titled the art of project management).

Links:

http://www.marketingsutra.com/blog/pm-marketing-bookshelf/

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On 08/05/11 6:57 AM, Chandrashekhar Ranade wrote:
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Leaders are L-earners .Learners are leaders .They learn how to l-earn; and naturally they earn.They earn love,respect, friendship, health ,time energy and of course …money !
Connect ?!
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On 08/05/11 11:18 AM, Erik Kleine wrote:
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If you want to be respected you have to give respect first.
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On 08/06/11 8:29 PM, Greg Chilson wrote:
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The best leaders tell a great story! This takes credibility, strong communication skills, vision, strategic thinking, and charisma. You want respect? Tell a great story, mean it, repeat it, and get the troops in line behind you!
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On 08/06/11 10:53 PM, Marc Kelemen wrote:
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The most important characteristic of a leader is having followers.

Developing leadership is a PROCESS — a journey not a destination.

The best “how to” I have encountered thus far is John C. Maxwell’s “The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership”.

Note — you may have to look past some of John’s judeo-christian platform — His “21 Laws” remain valid regardless of you personal choice of Architect (intelligent design) or pure Dawinian atheism

Links:

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On 08/08/11 5:46 PM, Richard Bentley, PhD, MBA wrote:
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Respect and trust go hand-in-hand; It’s hard to respect someone you don’t trust and hard to trust someone you don’t respect. The foundation of both is honesty and integrity. Upholding values and principles that you purport, even in tough situations – as many others have answered, walk the talk. And, most of all, truly respect the individuals on your team. You don’t have to make perfect decisions but you must be able to admit when you don’t. Be open to considering new ideas and making changes when new information warrants it. Listen to others and suspend judgement while doing so. You don’t have to follow their suggestions but they need to feel that you consider and value their input in your decision-making process.

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3 Comments

Leaders earn respect by way of their indulgence, knowledge and hardwork. And yes trustworthiness.

Hi Bhaskar,
Thanks for the comment I do agree with and these are important traits for every leader.

Interesting blog! Is your theme custom made or did you download it
from somewhere? A design like yours with a few simple tweeks would really make my blog shine.
Please let me know where you got your theme. Cheers

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